After-work drinks have been ruined by Gen Z partygoers.

Is Happy Hour truly that cheerful?

That’s the topic of discussion as employees return to work — and possibly grab drinks with coworkers at the end of the day.

Some young millennials and Gen Zers, who are always concerned with “healthy” work-life boundaries, are refusing to socialise with coworkers.

 

“I enjoy my private life and enjoy to not hangout with coworkers when I’m trying to relax and not think about work,” Michael Nicosia, 27, told The Post.

The Dallas, Tex.-based asset manager likes the people in his office, but, when he’s off-the-clock, he prefers to not be thinking about work.

“When I’ve previously gone out with co-workers for drinks, 90% of the conversation is centered around work, work gossip, and the like,” he said.

Michael Nicosia likes keeping his distance between work and personal life.
Michael Nicosia likes keeping his distance between work and personal life.

Some, like Diamond Nelson, 23 and a nursing assistant in the Baltimore area, are “guarded” after bad experiences hanging out with colleagues.

Nelson once invited a co-worker to her home and things seemed fine at the time. But, the next day at work, Nelson heard mean comments about the “lack of luxury” in her living situation.

“Not everyone has your best interest at heart. That’s why I don’t [socialize] with co-workers,” Nelson told The Post. “I’ve seen how things can be used against me.”

Still, there are many who love hanging out outside of the office.

Emma Sofferman (l), Margie O'Brien, Lexie Thomas, and Devin Gately frequent happy hour together as friends and colleagues. They got drinks at The Crooked Knife Tuesday evening.
Emma Sofferman (from left), Margie O’Brien, Lexie Thomas, and Devin Gately frequent happy hour together as friends and colleagues. They got drinks at the Crooked Knife Tuesday evening.

Margie O’Brien, a tech sales rep, said she gets along with co-workers so well that they hang out one or two times a week, even on weekends.

“Not all colleagues like each other but we all do and we know we’re lucky to have that,” the 25-year-old told The Post while out to drinks with her work team at the Crooked Knife in Midtown East.

Friends Alex Tang and Austin Cheng like to wind down together after work at spots like Clinton Hall.
Friends Alex Tang and Austin Cheng like to wind down together after work at spots like Clinton Hall.

Austin Cheng, a 38-year-old who works in healthcare, echoed the sentiments.

“I really enjoy the freedom of expression there is with getting to know people outside of work. Not to mention it’s quite relaxing to end a hard day over a nice beer,” he told The Post while having a cold one with pal and co-worker Alex Tang, 33, at Clinton Hall in Midtown.

“Innovation happens outside of the office too,” Tang who lives in Gramercy, added.

Gen Z aren't fans of going out with co-workers. They and others want distinct boundaries between their work and social lives.
Gen Z isn’t fans of going out with co-workers. They and others want distinct boundaries between their work and social lives.

Allison Tack, Montclair, NJ-based career and life coach, said networking is a definite upside to socializing with colleagues.

“People are often asking me how to get new jobs. And more than 95% of my clients find their new jobs with the support of their professional network,” Task told The Post. “Strengthening your collegial relationships is essential for a healthy, long career.”

But, she said it’s important to not have too much fun with co-workers.

“If you are known to overdo it, you probably don’t want to bring that problem out into your workspace,” she said. “When you’re out with colleagues, it’s your workspace.”

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